Mazamorra, Argentinean white hominy pudding

¡Mazamorra caliente para las viejas sin dientes!

“Hot mazamorra for toothless ladies” was how freedwomen and  slaves advertised their dessert for sale in the street at the top of their voices. Or, at any rate, this is the romanticized image we had at school of how these women in wide skirts and a white kerchief covering their hair tried to attract customers.

This was part of almost every pageant we did at school to mark Independence Day or any other national holiday.  The scene was more or less the same: a reenactment of the country’s emancipation from Spain in 1810 or that of the declaration of Independence in 1816.

Every social sector was represented: from the rich gentry and merchants to street vendors and soon-to-be-freed slaves. The street vendors were, traditionally, the mazamorra and empanada sellers and chandlers. As a child, mazamorra always intrigued me as we never ate it at home. As children do, I created my own, albeit vague, idea of what it was. I knew it was something sweet and made with white corn and that was that.

My mazamorra, thick and creamy and filling.

My mazamorra, thick and creamy and filling.

Cut to the present. I was recently trying to clean out the pantry before a longish trip when I came across a bag of white hominy, some of which I had used to make locro. There was a recipe on the back: white hominy pudding. It was none other than the mysterious mazamorra of school pageants and history books. I decided to make it so I could finally taste it.

Mazamorra is  quite popular in Latin America and its ingredients vary from one country to the other. In Argentina, we make it with white corn, milk, sugar and maybe a cinnamon stick or lemon rind. A very simple yet somewhat labour-intensive dessert. It is very filling and warming, ideal for a winter’s evening.

Ingredients

1/2 pound dry white corn (hominy)

2 litres milk

Lemon rind

Be patient!

Be patient! It’s worth the effort.

Soak the corn overnight. Drain and rinse. Place in a large pot and cover with water. Boil until the water starts to evaporate and add the milk, sugar and lemon or cinnamon. Bring to a boil and simmer until the corn is soft and the mixture thickens. If liquid evaporates quickly, add boiling milk. Remove the rind or stick and serve warm.

¡Buen provecho!

 

16 Comments

  1. 76sanfermo

    Nunca lo he probado pero la idea me apetece….
    Gracias por la receta y la historia!

    Reply
    1. Ana

      Probala y contame!

      Reply
  2. Aledys Ver

    I grew up eating mazamorra, at least during my periods in the “campo” at my grandparents’ house. I didn’t like milk so I used to have it boiled and with salt, so it was not a pudding for me. My grandma and then my mum also used to serve it with “puchero” and in soups. I love it and never come back from Argentina without some white corn.

    Reply
    1. Ana

      Thanks fro sharing childhood memories!

      Reply
  3. Rosemarie of Travel and Beyond

    Thank you for this delightful recipe. Looks quite simple… which I love!
    Rosemarie of Travel and Beyond recently posted…Enlighten 2016 – Culture and Creativity Illuminate CanberraMy Profile

    Reply
    1. Ana O (Post author)

      You’re welcome! Let me know if you make it.

      Reply
  4. Rosemary

    It’s fascinating reading your childhood memories with Mazammora. We wrote a recent post about this delicious dessert that we discovered in Peru. We had it there mixed with the purple corn. Fell in love with this dessert. Thanks for sharing the recipe.
    Rosemary recently posted…The 6 Criollo Dishes You Should Eat in PeruMy Profile

    Reply
    1. Ana O (Post author)

      Thank you, Rosemary! We don’t grow purple corn but it sounds like a more fun and colourful dish 🙂

      Reply
  5. Elissa

    It’s great when food has a story, glad you finally got to make this dish and it brought back those memories.

    Reply
  6. Brenda Tolentino

    I love the story attached to this recipe. How interesting that you always learned about it in shool yet never had it until now. It’s a dish I’m sure my husband would love.
    Brenda Tolentino recently posted…Crispy Chicken Adobo RecipeMy Profile

    Reply
    1. Ana O (Post author)

      I guess my mum cooked other dishes 🙂

      Reply
  7. Anna @ shenANNAgans

    Now I can tell my baby niece she is eating ‘Hot mazamorra for toothless ladies’… Haha. 🙂 I didn’t know the story behind it, but my mom used to make us something similar when we were growing up, it doesnt look much, but small folk, they LOVE it.

    Reply
    1. Ana O (Post author)

      You’re right, it does not look like much! But it’s comfort food, though.

      Reply
  8. Eileen | The Food Avenue

    What a comforting looking dish! Thanks for sharing 🙂

    Reply
    1. Ana O (Post author)

      You’re welcome

      Reply
  9. Serina aka Ms Frugal Ears

    This looks fabulous. I had never heard of it. Seems simple yet comforting.

    Reply

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