Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Orange

This is a new photo challenge, at least for me. This week, Cee’s prompt is THE COLOUR ORANGE. It happens to be one of my favourite colours too.

I snapped this rooster at the Jersey Lavender Farm on the beautiful island of Jersey (Channel Islands.)

lavender farm

These traditional fishing boats are a top tourist attraction in the Argentinean seaside resort of Mar del Plata. Fishermen still earn their living following the traditions of their ancestors.

mar del plata

The sun set over the Lone Star Park in Grand Prairie, Texas, as we were getting ready to bet on the pretty gee-gees.

lone star racecourse

Istanbul street scenes

Allow me show you what I saw through my lens around Istanbul.

A simit vendor mingling with fishermen on Galata Bridge
A simit vendor mingling with fishermen on Galata Bridge
A leisurely stroll around Sultanahmet Square in the late afternoon.
A leisurely stroll around Sultanahmet Square in the late afternoon.
Street food
Even busy people have time to sit down and eat some street food
Spices at the Spice Market. Their colours and smells pervaded the whole place.
Spices at the Spice Market. Their colours and smells pervaded the whole place.
A shoeshiner with his traditional tackle.
A shoeshiner with his traditional tackle.
Eminonu
Eminonu
Taksim Square area. I was surprised by how Eropean these streets looks. It could anywhere, Madrid, Paris or Lisbon.
Taksim Square area. I was surprised by how Eropean these streets looks. It could anywhere, Madrid, Paris or Lisbon.
The streets around the Grand Bazaar are eerily quiet in the early evening.
The streets around the Grand Bazaar are eerily quiet in the early evening.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflections

This week’s photo challenge is about reflections. I found it hard to narrow down my selection of photos as I’m intrigued by the effects of light and I do like to photograph different examples of reflections, so bear with me.

yorkmkinster
York Mister, York, England

arboretum
Dallas Arboretum

me toronto
Me in the Financial District of Toronto

iglesiasanmiguel
The church of San Miguel (built between 1731-1734) in Buenos Aires, is reflected on the windows of the bank across the street.
 methodistdallas
Downtown Dallas
Last, but not least, one from one of my favouritest (is that a word?) places of earth: the isle of Jersey. This the La Rocco Tower in St. Ouen's Bay)
Last, but not least, one from one of my favouritest (is that a word?) places of earth: the isle of Jersey. This the La Rocco Tower in St. Ouen’s Bay)

CBBH Photo Challenge: windows

I recently came across this photo challenge organized by East of Malaga blog and I though it was fun. This month’s theme is “windows,” which can lead to many different directions.

Here’s a few windows from around the world that caught my attention for different reasons:

The ground floor window at the Dallas Museum of Art. Those glass flowers were made by American artist Dale Chichuly and decorate this wonderful window of the Cafe.
A typical example of rural architecture in Carlos Keen, Argentina.

 

I adore those wrought iron balconies in Dinan, France
A somewhat unconventional shop window in Kensington Market, Toronto, Canada.
I love the reflection of the clouds on this window from a farmhouse in Jersey, Channel Islands.
An example of typical Spanish colonial architecture in Lujan, Argentina
The Chagall window at Chichester Cathedral, England

I discovered this challenge through this post by Meg Travels. Thanks!

Have a look at Restless Jo’s blog if you’re interested in Portugal. Great photos!

 

 

 

 

 

Of graveyards and stories

This gray, rainy Sunday made me think of graveyards, I’m not sure why. I have this love-hate relationship with them, you see. I hate to think about the degradation of the flesh and that sort of thing, but, on the other hand, I’m drawn to the names and dates on the headstones.

Who were they? What kind of life did they live? What happened to them? Were they happy? I like to romanticize what I read about the deceased. But I can only do that with old graves; the older, the better. One of my favourite things to do when travelling is to visit old churches, which usually have a graveyard attached. I enjoy the peace and quiet and they are generally surrounded by beautiful gardens.

When we lived in Jersey (as in the Channel Islands, not “Joisy” in the US), I would visit each parish church and read the headstones. There were wives who outlived their husbands, beloved husbands who perished at sea, maiden aunts who died in the prime of youth, brave sons who died in battle. All this happened in the 18th and 19th centuries, which made me feel comfortable reading, I think, because it put more distance between us. I don’t think I can do it with recent graves.

St. Brelade (Jersey CI) Most headstones were too weather-beaten to read

Visiting cemeteries can also become a learning experience. A couple of years ago, my parents and I visited the town of Capilla del Señor, about one and a half hours northwest of Buenos Aires (Argentina). The oldest part of the local cemetery has graves that date back to the 1860s. Interestingly, many of the headstones were written in English or in French because of the many Irish and French settlers in the area. There were also reminders of the terrible yellow fever epidemic that ravaged the country in the early 1870s: a whole family was buried there who died in the span of one week and a mass grave of the fever’s victims.

Capilla del Señor Cemetery

Another learning experience for me was visiting the Anglican church at Millbrook (St. Helier, Jersey). This church is surrounded by gorgeous gardens. From a distance, I saw what I thought was a garden feature made with rocks. On closer inspection, it turned out to be a four thousand year old Neolithic passage grave. How fantastic is it that I was able to see something I’d only read about in books! My inner nerd was doing cartwheels.

Neolithic passage grave (Jersey CI)

So far, the most moving experience I’ve had in a cemetery (outside of funerals I’ve attended) was visiting the American War Cemetery in Omaha Beach, Normandy (France). Although I have no ties with World War II since neither my country nor my ancestors took part in it, the endless sea of white crosses was a sobering sight that brought tears to my eyes. I couldn’t help mourning the monumental waste of young lives (it was necessary, I know, but still). On a frivolous note, this is where the opening scene of Saving Private Ryan was shot.

American War Cemetery - Omaha Beach (Normandy, France)

Do you like to visit old or historic cemeteries as well?