What to do in the Dallas West End

To walk around the Dallas West End is like going back to the golden era of the railways and industry. The red brick buildings lend the area an intresting Victorian industrial air.

After suffering economic decline, these factories and warehouses became restaurants, stores, and offices. As a result, the area also became attractive to tourists.

The redbrick warehouses of the Dallas West End Historic District  are now restaurants, shops, and businesses. This is the birthplace of Dallas and a great place to visit.

Although it’s rather touristy, I really like walking around the West End. I adore the redbrick facades and the old, somewhat faded, advertisements painted on the walls. It’s got a soul, a definite personality that screams “I’m Dallas!’

Where to eat in the Dallas West End

Every so often, we eat at Y.O. Ranch. The decor of this steakhouse is heavily laden with cowhide, antlers, and stuffed animals. The food, though, is pretty good.

Ellen’s does brunch all day and afternoon tea on Thursdays. Oh, and margarita Monday’s. I mean, come on.

Whiskey bar, did you say? 3Eleven Kitchen and Cocktails has got you covered. They also serve American classics with a twist.

The redbrick warehouses of the Dallas West End Historic District  are now restaurants, shops, and businesses. This is the birthplace of Dallas and a great place to visit.

What’s to see in the Dallas West End?

Shopping is always a good idea. Get your cowboy boots, hats, and jewelry at Wild Bill’s Western Wear.

The city’s founder, John Neely Bryan, built his log cabin not far from here in the 1840s, so we can say that the West End is the birthplace of Dallas.

The West End is steeped in history. This is the place where JFK was assassinated. The Sixth Floor Museum chronicles the event and is located inside the Texas School Book Depository. You can see where Lee Harvey Oswald supposedly fired his gun. You can walk around the Grassy Knoll, where everything happened. There will be many people trying to sell you tours and informative material. It’s up to you to interact with them.

The Old Red museum chronicles the history of Dallas. And it has some interesting artifacts on display, like JR Ewing’s Stetson hat donated by Larry Hagman. Or Clyde Barrow’s gun , he of Bonnie and Clyde fame.

The redbrick warehouses of the Dallas West End Historic District  are now restaurants, shops, and businesses. This is the birthplace of Dallas and a great place to visit.

The John F. Kennedy Memorial is right behind the Old Red. And Founder’s Plaza, with a replica of John Neely Bryan’s cabi, is across the street, along with the Dallas County Sheriff Honor Guard Memorial.

A poignant part of the world’s history is displayed at the Dallas Holocaust Museum.

The West End is served by public transport. The DART has a station called West End.

The West End’s origins

Towards the 1840s, the lawyer and explorer John Neely Bryan bought this land from the Caddo indians and built a log cabin. You can see the replica on the corner of Market and Elm. As time went by, a trading postflourished and the town of Dallas grew around it.

The advent of the Houston & Texas Central Railroad in 1872 attracted amnufacturing companies, which built their warehouses here. The 1960s brought economic decline, but in the 1970s, developers began to invest and the West End was rvitalised.

The redbrick warehouses of the Dallas West End Historic District  are now restaurants, shops, and businesses. This is the birthplace of Dallas and a great place to visit.

The Dallas West End is a 15-minute walk from Downtown Dallas along Elm Street.

The redbrick warehouses of the Dallas West End Historic District  are now restaurants, shops, and businesses. This is the birthplace of Dallas and a great place to visit.

Texas United States

Ana View All →

Hi, I’m Ana. I’m originally from Argentina but I’m currently living in Dallas (USA) with my British husband. I’d like to share my experiences as an expat and as a traveller.

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