5 small Texas towns you must visit

Para leer esta nota en castellano, pincha este enlace.

Experience Southern gentility and hospitality in these small Texas towns. Each one has a unique heritage forged by its location and history

Antique shops, independent boutiques, wine tasting, and water sports are some of the activities they have in store for visitors. These towns are fantastic for all kinds of trips, from a romantic weekend getaway to a family road trip.

Discover a new side to Texas!

German-Texan heritage in Gruene    

Gruene is a gem of a town located roughly halfway between Austin and San Antonio, in the Texas Hill Country. Gruene, pronounced “green,” was first settled by German farmers in the 1840s. the Gruene family introduced cotton farming, which brought prosperity to the area. Some fine examples of late Victorian architecture still stand, like the Gruene Mansion or Gruene House, both Bed and Breakfasts now. Gruene was included in the National Register of Historic Places in 1975, which allowed it to retain an authentic turn-of-the-century look and feel.   

Antique stores, boutiques, art galleries, and a general store line the streets of Gruene. In addition, the town boasts the oldest continually operating dance hall in Texas, Gruene Hall, built in 1878. Another landmark is The Gristmill Restaurant, built in the shell of an 1878 cotton mill and has beautiful views of the Guadalupe River down below. In summer, people can rent tubing, stand-up paddle boarding, and kayaking equipment and go on the nearby Guadalupe and Comal rivers.  

19th century charm in Jefferson

Jefferson, once a bustling river port, now radiates Southern grace. The town was founded in the 1840s in Northeastern Texas. Jefferson is about 170 miles east of Dallas and less than an hour from the Louisiana border. Thanks to a giant log jam on the Red River, the water level of the Caddo Lake and Red Rover rose by several feet. This enabled commercial navigation to Jefferson from places as far as St. Louis and New Orleans along the Mississippi. The town flourished until 1873, when the Army Corps of Engineers blew up the log jam, considered a navigational hazard, thus lowering the water levels and making riverboat traffic no longer viable.

Many of the Victorian mansions were converted into Bed and Breakfasts. Jefferson has more registered historic buildings than anywhere in Texas, as well as the state’s oldest working hotel. The Excelsior House Hotel dates from 1858 and has had distinguished guests like Oscar Wilde or Ulysses S. Grant. Jefferson is said to be haunted, so visitors can learn all about local legends during a ghost walk. The Jefferson General Store, from 1879, is a must-visit. To take a break from so much history, swamp tours, canoeing, and fishing are available at the Caddo Lake close by.

Antique shops, independent boutiques, wine tasting, and water sports are some of the activities they have in store. These towns are fantastic for all kinds of trips, from a romantic weekend getaway to a family road trip. #Texas #travel

Historic Granbury

Granbury lies on the shores of Lake Granbury in North Central Texas. It all started when Tennessee emigrants came to settle on the Brazos River in 1854. Elizabeth Crockett, the widow of Davy Crockett, also settled here, on land given to the heirs of those who fought in the Texas Revolution of 1836. The settlement grew, and, in 1887, the Fort Worth and Rio Grande Railway connected Granbury with other towns.

Elizabeth Crockett also has her own statue at the Elizabeth Crocket State Historic Park, the smallest state park in Texas. Among other landmarks are the Historic Railroad Depot of 1914 or the Brazos Drive-In Theater from 1952, which is Texas’ longest continually running drive-in theater. The Hood County Courthouse, a three-story limestone building from 1890-1, dominates the square. The surrounding buildings, many of which are also registered historic landmarks, house boutiques, antique stores, and art galleries, among other businesses. The annual Granbury Wine Walk takes place in and around the square and features local wines, food, and art. Where to stay? In a Victorian B&B, where else!  

Marble Falls, the heart of the Hill Country

Marble Falls is nestled among rolling hills, vineyards, and lakes in Central Texas. Marble Falls Lake is within walking distance of the Historic Downtown area and provides a welcome respite from all that walking and shopping and visiting art galleries. Art features prominently in Marble Falls. Its main street is lined with sculptures, and the annual Sculpture on Main Fest showcases the best local artists. There are plenty of eating and drinking establishments, but one stands out: the Blue Bonnet Café. This café has been serving homestyle pies since 1929 and still draws big crowds. Be prepared to wait.

Marble Falls is surrounded by wonderful places to enjoy nature that are very close. Locals and visitors go boating, kayaking, and fishing at Inks and Buchanan lakes. Would-be speleologists should take a guided cave tour of the Longhorn Cavern. The Balcones Canyonlands National Wildlife Refuge preserves the habitat of endangered songbirds. Enchanted Rock is a colossal pink granite dome that people can climb or enjoy from a distance. The star of the Pedernales Falls State Park is the Pedernales River, which flows over massive limestone slabs and can turn into a raging torrent in the blink of an eye, as flash floods are common in the Hill Country.

Sulphur Springs’ revitalized downtown area

Sulphur Springs is in Northeast Texas, about 80 miles from Dallas. Its name comes from the now dried-up sulfurous water springs and it was settled in the 1850s. The advent of the railroad in 1872 gave the small town an economic boost. Later, in the mid-twentieth century, the dairy industry became a major component of the local economy. However, it started to decline in the late 90s, along with the town’s fortunes.

Recently, the town’s authorities started a process of revitalization of the downtown area, though. Behind colorful storefronts are independent boutiques, restaurants, and bars, among other businesses. Every façade has been restored to its past splendor. And the trees that line the streets provide welcome shade in the hotter months. The town square, also newly revamped, includes the Romanesque Revival courthouse (built in 1894-5), a very moving veteran memorial and a splash pad in the shape of the Lone Star. However, the biggest attraction are the glass public toilets. Not to worry! They are covered in one-way mirrors that reflect the light and blend in with the surroundings. 

Experience Southern gentility and hospitality in these small Texas towns. Each one has a unique heritage forged by its location and history
Pin this!

5 pueblos texanos que no te podés perder

Viví la elegancia y la hospitalidad sureñas en estos pequeños pueblos de Texas. Cada uno tiene un patrimonio único forjado gracias a su ubicación e historia

Negocios de antigüedades, boutiques independientes, catas de vino y deportes acuáticos son algunas de las actividades que tienen reservadas para los visitantes. Estos pueblos son fantásticos para todo tipo de viajes, desde una escapada romántica de fin de semana hasta un road trip en familia.

Descubrí una cara diferente de Texas.

Herencia alemana en Gruene


Gruene es una belleza pueblerina ubicada aproximadamente a medio camino entre Austin y San Antonio, en el Texas Hill Country. Gruene, pronunciado “green“, fue colonizado por primera vez por agricultores alemanes en la década de 1840. La familia Gruene introdujo el cultivo del algodón, que a su vez trajo prosperidad a la zona. Todavía quedan algunos buenos ejemplos de la arquitectura victoriana tardía, como la Mansión Gruene o la Casa Gruene, ambos convertidos en Bed and Breakfast. Gruene fue incluido en el Registro Nacional de Lugares Históricos en 1975, lo que le permitió conservar su aspecto y ambiente auténticos de principios de siglo.

Tiendas de antigüedades, boutiques, galerías de arte y un almacén general pueblan las calles de Gruene. Además, el pueblo cuenta con el salón de baile más antiguo de Texas en uso continuado, Gruene Hall, construido en 1878. Otro hito es The Gristmill Restaurant, construido en las ruinas de una fábrica de algodón de 1878 y tiene hermosas vistas del río Guadalupe. En verano, la gente puede alquilar flotantes, stand-up paddles y kayaks e ir a los ríos cercanos Guadalupe y Comal.

Elegancia victoriana en Jefferson

Jefferson, que alguna vez fue un bullicioso puerto fluvial, ahora irradia encanto sureño. La ciudad fue fundada en la década de 1840 en el noreste de Texas. Jefferson está a unas 170 millas al este de Dallas y a menos de una hora de la frontera con Luisiana. Gracias a un atasco de troncos gigante en el Red River, el nivel del agua del lago Caddo y del Red Rover aumentó varios metros. Esto permitió la navegación comercial a Jefferson desde lugares tan lejanos como St. Louis y Nueva Orleans a lo largo del Mississippi. La ciudad floreció hasta 1873, cuando el Cuerpo de Ingenieros del Ejército hizo estallar el atasco de troncos, considerado un peligro para la navegación, reduciendo así los niveles de agua y haciendo inviable el tráfico fluvial.

Muchas de las mansiones victorianas se convirtieron en Bed and Breakfasts. Jefferson tiene más edificios históricos registrados que en cualquier lugar de Texas, así como el hotel en funcionamiento más antiguo del estado. El Excelsior House Hotel data de 1858 y alojó pasajeros distinguidos como Oscar Wilde o el presidente Ulysses S. Grant. Se dice que Jefferson está embrujado, por lo que los visitantes pueden aprender todo sobre las leyendas locales durante una caminata guiada nocturna. La Jefferson General Store, de 1879, es una visita obligada. Para tomar un descanso de tanta historia, en el cercano lago Caddo se pueden realizar recorridos por los pantanos, hacer kayak y pescar.

Viví la elegancia y la hospitalidad sureñas en estos pequeños pueblos de Texas. Cada uno tiene un patrimonio único forjado gracias a su ubicación e historia. #Texas #viajes #EstadosUnidos

Raíces revolucionarias en Granbury

Granbury se encuentra a orillas del lago Granbury, en el centro-norte de Texas. Todo comenzó cuando unos pioneros oriundos de Tennessee llegaron a establecerse en el río Brazos en 1854. Elizabeth Crockett, la viuda de Davy Crockett (quien luchó en la Batalla del Alamo contra fuerzas mexicanas), también se instaló aquí. Esas tierras fueron entregadas a los herederos de quienes lucharon en la Revolución de Texas de 1836. El asentamiento creció, y, en 1887, el ferrocarril de Fort Worth y Rio Grande llegó a conectar Granbury con otras ciudades.

Elizabeth Crockett tiene su propia estatua en el Parque Histórico Estadual Elizabeth Crocket, el más pequeño de Texas. Entre otros lugares de interés, se encuentran el histórico Railroad Depot de 1914 o el Brazos Drive-In Theatre de 1952, que es el autocine más antiguo de Texas en funcionamiento continuo. El Palacio de Justicia del Condado de Hood, un edificio de piedra caliza de tres pisos de 1890-1, domina la plaza. Los edificios circundantes, muchos de los cuales también son monumentos históricos registrados, alojan boutiques, anticuarios y galerías de arte, entre otros negocios. El Granbury Wine Walk anual se lleva a cabo dentro y alrededor de la plaza y presenta vinos, comida y artesanías locales. ¿Donde alojarse? En un B&B victoriano, ¿dónde más?

Marble Falls, en el corazón del Hill Country

Marble Falls está ubicado entre colinas, viñedos y lagos en el centro de Texas. Marble Falls Lake se encuentra a poca distancia a pie del área del centro histórico. El parque junto al lago ofrece un respiro de tanto caminar, ir de compras y visitar galerías de arte. El arte ocupa un lugar destacado en Marble Falls. Su calle principal está llena de esculturas, y el festival anual de esculturas Main Fest exhibe a los mejores artistas locales. Hay muchos establecimientos para comer y beber, pero se destaca el Blue Bonnet Café. Este café sirve pastelería casera desde 1929 y atrae a grandes multitudes. Preparate para esperar un buen rato en la vereda.

Marble Falls está rodeado de lugares maravillosos para disfrutar de la naturaleza y que se encuentran muy cerca. Los lugareños y visitantes salen a andar en bote y kayak y pescar en los lagos Inks y Buchanan. Los aspirantes a espeleólogos deberían realizar una visita guiada a las cuevas de Longhorn Cavern. El Refugio Nacional de Vida Silvestre Balcones Canyonlands preserva el hábitat de aves en peligro de extinción. Enchanted Rock es una colosal cúpula de granito rosa que la gente puede escalar o disfrutar desde lejos. La estrella del Parque Estadual Pedernales Falls es el río Pedernales, que fluye sobre enormes losas de piedra caliza y puede convertirse en un torrente furioso en un abrir y cerrar de ojos, ya que las inundaciones repentinas son comunes en el Hill Country.

Sulphur Springs y su centro modernizado

Sulphur Springs se encuentra en el noreste de Texas, a unas 80 millas de Dallas. Su nombre proviene de los manantiales de agua sulfurosa, que ahora están secos, y se estableció en la década de 1850. La llegada del ferrocarril en 1872 dio a la pequeña ciudad un fuerte impulso económico. Más tarde, a mediados del siglo XX, la industria láctea se convirtió en un componente importante de la economía local. Sin embargo, comenzó a declinar a finales de los ’90, junto con la fortuna de la ciudad.

Sin embargo, hace poco, las autoridades del pueblo iniciaron un proceso de revitalización del centro de la ciudad. Detrás de coloridos vidrieras se encuentran boutiques independientes, restaurantes y bares, entre otros. Cada fachada ha sido restaurada a su antiguo esplendor. Los árboles que bordean las calles brindan una agradable sombra en los meses más calurosos. La plaza del pueblo, también recientemente renovada, incluye el palacio de justicia, de estilo renacentista románico (construido en 1894-5), un monumento a los veteranos muy conmovedor y una fuente con la forma de la Estrella Solitaria, el símbolo de Texas. Sin embargo, la mayor atracción son los baños públicos de vidrio. ¡No es para preocuparse! Están cubiertos de espejos unidireccionales que reflejan la luz y se mimetizan con el entorno.

English Texas Travel United States

Ana View All →

Hi, I’m Ana. I’m originally from Argentina but I’m currently living in Dallas (USA) with my British husband. I’d like to share my experiences as an expat and as a traveller.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: